The Clever Coatings of Coronavirus

Episode 2 October 20, 2020 00:51:13
The Clever Coatings of Coronavirus
Big Compute
The Clever Coatings of Coronavirus
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Show Notes

It’s been months since the infamous coronavirus has crept across the globe, closing schools and workplaces and changing the way we live our lives.  But why is COVID-19 seemingly so good at infecting people?  What makes this virus different than others?  We talk to undercover superhero, Rommie Amaro of the University of California San Diego, about her discoveries through computational simulation of what the virus actually looks like, how it moves, and what that means for each of us.

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